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Okay, Here Down Under, we're still in the Stone Age and are stuck with the ... Stackers' Lounge forum

  1. #1
    CybaCowboy's Avatar
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    Difference Between Analog/Digital/Internet/Satellite Radio?

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    Okay,


    Here Down Under, we're still in the Stone Age and are stuck with the old-fashioned, analog radio - digital tuners and stereo reception are the latest innovations for radio here!

    Now I know what "Internet radio" is - radio that is provided by an Internet site as I understand it - but what about the digital and satellite radio you guys overseas are always going on about?

    What is digital radio, what is satellite radio and how do they differ to the other forms of radio available?

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    rokinDa8703e's Avatar
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    ~via BB (wap.pinstack.com)~
    I'm not too sure about digital radio but satellite radio is just like satellite tv. You get an antenna and slap it on your car/house and plug in your Xm or serius (soon to be the same) radio and you get it. Most stations are commercial free

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    CybaCowboy's Avatar
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    So let me see if I understand this correctly - assuming I had satellite radio on my BlackBerry, I would have a satellite and/or antenna installed in my car/house, which my BlackBerry would connect to (wirelessly?) to receive ad-free radio?

    What benefits does this offer over the other forms of radio (particularly Internet-based radio, which is mostly ad-free and doesn't require a separate antenna)?

    Maybe I'm missing something, but satellite radio doesn't appear to be that much of a revolution, in fact next to Internet radio, it seems somewhat old-fashioned to me...


    ~via my BlackBerry Curve 8300 (wap.pinstack.com)~

  4. #4
    Specs's Avatar
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    I'll try to help a bit if I can!
    I'm not sure about a satellite receiver to wi fi box which is what you would need for scenario you suggest, most satellite radios have their own built in aerial and range from small personal radio size up to large portable ones.

    I don't know which angle of difference you'd like explained but feel free to ask if I don't cover it in the answer below.
    The basis for Satellite / Digital stations is that in some territories they offer a greater deal of choice over the strictly regulated (in the UK anyway) analogue stations.
    Generally speaking, the analogue ones have to be licensed and regulated by the industry body (Ofcom in the UK) which makes sure they adhere to their format. This means that if the station has a license to broadcast oldies, for example, they cannot decide to change into a Jazz/Rock/Classical/whatever station.
    This means that there is always a section of the audience that feels under served by the mainstream stations. Thus the opening for the less regulated satellite stations.
    In the UK , digital stations are frequently owned by the same radio groups as the analogue ones and sometimes offer an extra choice but because the medium is still quite expensive (both in terms of bandwidth for the broadcaster and receivers for the listener) it has been slow to catch on.
    Technically, digital radio has the capability of being better quality than analogue but due to bandwidth costs this is not often realised, the operator use less bandwidth to keep the costs down; some even broadcast in mono.
    When it was launched here we were told that it sounded as good as or better than CD.
    Of course, it doesn't.
    We were also told that it would be hiss and crackle free. This is true but by it's nature digital does not have fringe areas in the same way that AM or FM radio does. The signal is either there, or it's not.
    In the UK we use a system called DAB whereas in other parts of Europe it's quite common to find another system called DRM. Obviously if there is no standardisation the receivers cannot be taken from one country to another which restricts their use a bit.

    I hope that helps?

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