Results 1 to 6 of 6

I'm trying to find out about device encryption when not apart of a BES IT ... Server Admins forum

  1. #1
    Optyx's Avatar
    Optyx no está en línea Stack level 2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    PIN/ID
    21CD6654
    Posts
    86

    device encryption and BES IT Policy

    Advertisement



    I'm trying to find out about device encryption when not apart of a BES IT Policy. Now in the IT policy can you enforce member devices being encrypted? And if not in the it policy and the device is encrypted is the password or key or any info logged by the BES Server? Thanks for reading hopefully there is an answer to this.


    Aaron Davis

  2. #2
    chatster18's Avatar
    chatster18 no está en línea Stack level 5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    PIN/ID
    ASK
    Posts
    1,121
    Can you specify what you are wanting to encrypt, the device memory or communications to and from the device.

    That should help.


    ~via BB (wap.pinstack.com)~

  3. #3
    Optyx's Avatar
    Optyx no está en línea Stack level 2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    PIN/ID
    21CD6654
    Posts
    86
    I'm concerned with encryption of the data on the device in a BES.

  4. #4
    chatster18's Avatar
    chatster18 no está en línea Stack level 5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    PIN/ID
    ASK
    Posts
    1,121
    The only thing that I can think of that you would be able to see is if you have any auditing in place, such as Email, phone call log, and sms logs. All that is stored in the clear... But all data relayed to and from the device is encrypted, so is data on the device.

    hope that answers your question.
    it's always greener with the other carrier...

  5. #5
    Medic's Avatar
    Medic no está en línea Stack level 4
    Join Date
    May 2008
    PIN/ID
    Stack
    Posts
    466
    The device uses an ecryption algorithm called ECC (Elliptic Curve Cryptography)

    Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) is emerging as an attractive public-key cryptosystem for mobile/wireless environments. Compared to traditional cryptosystems like RSA, ECC offers equivalent security with smaller key sizes, which results in faster computations, lower power consumption, as well as memory and bandwidth savings. This is especially useful for mobile devices which are typically limited in terms of their CPU, power and network connectivity. However, the true impact of any public-key cryptosystem can only be evaluated in the context of a security protocol. This presents a first estimate of the performance improvements that can be expected in SSL (Secure Socket Layer), the dominant security protocol on the Web today, by adding ECC support.


    That being said here is exactly what the device operates at when content protection is enabled.

    Strong: 160 Bit ECC

    Stronger: 283 Bit ECC

    Strongest: 571 Bit ECC


    I hope that helps you out.
    Sorrow is tranquility remembered in emotion.

  6. #6
    markgallant's Avatar
    markgallant no está en línea Stack level 3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    430
    In all honesty content protections can cause a lot of problems on the blackberry device. It would be best just to force a password to the device that way if someone obtains the device they cannot access the device without the password and after a certain number of attempts (Which you can Specify) the device will be completely wiped of all containing data.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •