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    kitk7's Avatar
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    Arrow Moto Q: Challenger to berry?

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    Hi everyone. I'm a senior in college and one of my minors is marketing. I have a case study due next week concerning the Moto Q and its challenge (according to my textbook) to the blackberry product line. For part of my assignment, I decided to come here, conduct my own research, and ask some of you fine folks to help me do well (and if you know anything about marketing, well, you're my new best friend) and give me some of your input along the way.

    So here are some questions I have; if you'd like to add anything else regarding the Moto Q, I'd love to hear it.

    -I actually disagree with my textbook's assertion that the Q is directly challenging blackberry. I think Verizon needs a viable competitor to RIM and they, as we all know, are well behind in offering the blackberry product line in a timely fashion (Curve?!!). Do you think the Q is specifically targeting the blackberry?

    -Biases aside, what are some features you find appealing about the Q? And what do you dislike? For that matter, any input on the blackberry on these questions would be greatly helpful as well.

    -For business users, would you use the Q (or a similar product) in an industrial setting? Or is the RIM push e-mail system the best out there for your specific needs?

    Thanks, that's all for now. I appreciate this a lot!

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    doughdaddy's Avatar
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    Re: Moto Q: Challenger to berry?

    Quote Originally Posted by kitk7 View Post
    Hi everyone. I'm a senior in college and one of my minors is marketing. I have a case study due next week concerning the Moto Q and its challenge (according to my textbook) to the blackberry product line. For part of my assignment, I decided to come here, conduct my own research, and ask some of you fine folks to help me do well (and if you know anything about marketing, well, you're my new best friend) and give me some of your input along the way.

    So here are some questions I have; if you'd like to add anything else regarding the Moto Q, I'd love to hear it.

    -I actually disagree with my textbook's assertion that the Q is directly challenging blackberry. I think Verizon needs a viable competitor to RIM and they, as we all know, are well behind in offering the blackberry product line in a timely fashion (Curve?!!). Do you think the Q is specifically targeting the blackberry?

    -Biases aside, what are some features you find appealing about the Q? And what do you dislike? For that matter, any input on the blackberry on these questions would be greatly helpful as well.

    -For business users, would you use the Q (or a similar product) in an industrial setting? Or is the RIM push e-mail system the best out there for your specific needs?

    Thanks, that's all for now. I appreciate this a lot!
    1: No, the Q is not a "challenger", what would actually be the "challenger" is the MS PPC software. The Q is just a tool to deliver it. So the MS PPC software is what would be targeting the BB.

    2: a: I had the Moto Q before getting my first BB, what attracted me to it originally was the size, screen size and the fact that VZW did not have a good BB solution at the time.
    b: My dislikes grew quick. To name a few; extreamly short battery life, even with an extended battery I had to charge it 2-3 times a day and that was with me closing apps after using them. Horrible internet connection; my laptop had a hard time recognising and keeping a connection to the Q as a tethered modem, Windows XP did not like its smaller brother very much and to the contrary, my BB cnnected the first time to XP and never got disconnected or had trouble installing. Terrible email wireless sync; unlike the great BB email push, the Q has no real contender to that and what they do offer had to be reset often to work correctly.

    3: I would never consider usng the Q again as a business handheld. The BB email, Internet and apps far out way theQ's attempts to copy.

    Hope ths is helpful, good luck in your class.

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    Re: Moto Q: Challenger to berry?

    I'm gonna back doughdaddy up on this one. The Q may have been designed to be a directly competitive handset but, it failed.

    Here's a Compare/Contrast for you with the Q being matched against the BB 8830 World Phone (I have both phones sitting infront of me)

    Physical Size: Same
    Screen: Same (blackberry's a bit brighter)
    Battery Life: Blackberry by far
    Camera: Q has a 1.3MP
    Expandable Memory: Q will take SOME 2GB miniSD cards, 8830 takes MOST 2GB and should take the 4GB fine once they release the non-microSDHC cards
    Navigation: This is an opinion point, neither is touch screen. The Q has the blackberry style scroll wheel and back button, as well as a 4 way directional with "click" button in the center. The 8830 has the new scrollball.
    Functionality: This is where the big arguement comes in. If we were talking about WM5/6 the scales would be tipped more towards the Q for the average user, because of more software out there, as well as much easier interface with the computer, however, we're not. The Q uses Windows Mobile SMARTPHONE edition which does NOT use the same software as regular PPC edition. There is considerably less software out there for it, which brings it back down into reach of the Blackberry in this aspect. The Blackberry is considerably more stable than the Q, I've had my pearl for a little over a month, and, ignoring the catastrophic software failure it suffered causing a phone replacement, I've never had it freeze, or glitch, or anything else. The average Q user has to reboot the phone at a minimum of once a day because WM doesn't quit programs when you leave them, nor does it automatically time them out. As far as Push capability, the Q DOES infact have push capability, but only if you're running Microsoft Exchange Server 2003, and have installed the Direct Push patch. The Blackberry has much better connectivity management, as it auto connects and disconnects as needed, whereas the Q will connect when ANY software requests a connection, and then stay connected.


    I could go on for a few pages if you really wanted, but, I don't want to write your paper for you. If you need help, you can shoot me a message at dhyde@alltel.blackberry.com or PIN me at 31852AA9

    Derek

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    Re: Moto Q: Challenger to berry?

    I actually sell both in my current job. I have a BB and my boyfriend has a Q. I can honestly say that he uses the Q everyday for work, something about his company and the email situation with the BB. But other then that he hates his phone. My customers have the most problems with the Q. But I will say that most of my customer use it for personal as opposed to business reasons. The Q in my opinion is extremely buggy and problematic. I really think it has something to do with Motorola. So I guess what I am saying is that as far as the Q is concerned, it doesn't touch the BB, but a windows mobile phone may give it competition.

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    Re: Moto Q: Challenger to berry?

    also....another thing to consider, from your initial post, is that the reason verizon/sprint/alltel don't have the 8300 (curve) yet is because RIM hasn't made a CDMA version of the phone, it's the same as why we all just got pearls but GSM has had one for a while.

    the carrier is only part of the reason you don't see the phones coming quickly. (though, when two of the same technology carriers (sprint/alltel/vzw) have the exact same phone and not the same features, it's usually the carrier's fault, not paying the price for the additional features or specifically requesting it not be included)

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    I don't believe the Q was meant as a challenger

    I believe the Q was never meant to challenge the RIM devices. It was targeted at a high end consumer market.

    At the time the Q was being designed, RIM was very weak in the consumer market. Motorola wanted a device to fill that niche just below the Enterprise user. It was never meant to appeal to corporate users or even highly sophisticated non-enterprise users. It was target at users who wanted email, but did not require the urgency of push mail. People who would make relatively casual use of the PIM features and did not require instant updates with the server databases.

    RIM had (and still does have) a reputation as a corporate device. That is changing with the introduction of the Pearl and Curve, and more multimedia capabilities, but at Q introduction time that was not the case. Many casual users are put off by the RIM interface. It's stock themes are quite garish. The carriers needed a device with an interface their users could understand. They intended it to be easier to learn because of a more familiar interface. I'm not saying they succeeded in those goals, but I believe that was the intention. The Pearl was an attempt by RIM to reach the same market.

    I believe Motorola and the carriers were hoping that the Q would allow them to attract a more sophisticated, high end customer using a "friendlier" phone than they could not reach with RIM products. The goal was to attract consumers who would use the data networks and, so, buy data plans with a device that appeared to make that easier than the competitive products at the time.

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    Re: Moto Q: Challenger to berry?

    ~via BB (wap.pinstack.com)~ My knowledge of the Q that I've gathered from other phone reps mirrors previous opinions: it's a boomerang. You'll see one or two that work, but if I were still in the biz I wouldn't be putting them in anyone's hands I sell to. Quite honestly I don't understand what was so hard for the average Joe to get about the 7250 or 7130e. What was lacking I think was the average sales rep's training: with a little familiarity you can teach anyone anything there is to know, but instead they were too lazy, so it was easier to simply say "Hey, it's Windows. You know what to do.". That's what the W offered, as well as being like the Razor which was the big seller at the time, so it was a no brainer which is what everyone selling anything automatically loves. It lets everyone be lazy...if it worked but it doesn't. The "problem" it was being sent to "solve" wasn't RIM. The perception problem was the problem: some idiot got the idea that the BB wasn't a consumer product, and enough idiots on both sides of the counter beleived it. That was the real driving force behind the Q.

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