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Does keeping your phone plugged into charger during the bed time mess up the battery ... Android Smartphones forum

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    visionthing's Avatar
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    Question Keeping your phone charging?

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    Does keeping your phone plugged into charger during the bed time mess up the battery life? Mytouch 4g.

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    No, these newer batteries like to be charged. I leave mine charging all night, every night, never had a battery go bad. Berries, iPhones, iPod Touch, etc. The older batteries liked to be drained, then recharged, but that is not the case with these new ones.
    ​Galaxy S4 Red

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    No, but it should be noted that it is always a good idea to reset the memory to maximize battery life. Drain it fully then let it charge to full before use again.

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    Thanks, but BHP77 I have read that it is not good to drain the battery. Now i'm puzzled.
    Last edited by visionthing; 12-24-2010 at 11:35 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by visionthing View Post
    Thanks, but BHP77 I have read that it is not good to drain the battery. Now i'm puzzled.
    It's fine to drain the battery. I've done it five or six times on my iP4. I get day and half of battery life if I needed to. Thats with heavy use Why wouldn't it be good to drain the battery?

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    These batteries like all will develop a memory. So, say that you almost always you put your phone on the charger with 20% battery left. Over time(many months, not weeks) it will develop a memory that it almost never gets below "20%". It doesn't mean that your battery is weaker than it use to be but depending on the algorithm used to calculate the displayed percentage it could appear as if you're losing battery life. So to help this you want to power cycle the battery. I do about once a month. Fully discharge to the point the phone cuts off. Then plug it in and let it reach full charge before unplugging or using. If you have trouble getting to that cut off point before bed, just stream some radio or play a movie. I've done that before to kill it out so it gets the charge overnight.

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    I second BHP on this... there´s actually a cheap application that does this automatically for you... and it woks. Look for Battery Doctor...
    You´ll notice the gain.

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    Thanks again. I appreciate the advice.

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    I am not sure the memory effect occurs in the newer batteries. If you are talking about the NiCd batteries which we used to have on all rechargeables this was a known problem and you would have to drain the battery completely to reset the memory effect. Battery technology has improved, and now the NiMh batteries while still having a slight problem do not have it so much that it would affect your phone, while the Lithium Ion batteries do not have a problem with memory at all

    Never completly discharge your battery (down to 0) as this can cause the battery to be useless, if you are still using NiCd then it is better to use a battery re-conditioner. As Delfim suggests Battery Doctor can be useful.

    With the new lithium batteries I have never seen a problem, NiMh after a few years of use have caused minor problems, but then it is probably time to replace them anyway

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    Use iPhone Regularly
    For proper maintenance of a lithium-based battery, it’s important to keep the electrons in it moving occasionally. Be sure to go through at least one charge cycle per month (charging the battery to 100% and then completely running it down).

    Standard Charging
    Most lithium-ion polymer batteries use a fast charge to charge your device to 80% battery capacity, then switch to trickle charging. That’s about two hours of charge time to power an iPod to 80% capacity, then another two hours to fully charge it, if you are not using the iPod while charging. You can charge all lithium-ion batteries a large but finite number of times, as defined by charge cycle.


    Charge Cycle. Using and recharging 100% of battery capacity equals one full charge cycle.
    A charge cycle means using all of the battery’s power, but that doesn’t necessarily mean a single charge. For instance, you could listen to your iPod for a few hours one day, using half its power, and then recharge it fully. If you did the same thing the next day, it would count as one charge cycle, not two, so you may take several days to complete a cycle. Each time you complete a charge cycle, it diminishes battery capacity slightly, but you can put notebook, iPod, and iPhone batteries through many charge cycles before they will only hold 80% of original battery capacity. As with other rechargeable batteries, you may eventually need to replace your battery.

    Taken from Apple

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