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The wireless industry is gearing up to fight new Net neutrality rules that the Federal ... Smartphone News forum

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    Phone companies say 'no' to Net neutrality for wireless

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    The wireless industry is gearing up to fight new Net neutrality rules that the Federal Communications Commission is formulating to keep the Internet open.
    On Monday, chairman of the FCC Julius Genachowski gave a speech at the Brookings Institute in Washington, D.C. where he outlined plans to turn the FCC's open Internet access principles into official regulation. In addition to making sure that network operators cannot prevent users from accessing lawful Internet content, applications, and services of their choice, or attaching non-harmful devices to the network, Genachowski wants to add two more rules.
    The first would prevent Internet access providers from discriminating against particular Internet content or applications, while allowing for reasonable network management. The second principle would ensure that Internet access providers are transparent about the network management practices they implement.
    Broadband providers, such as AT&T, Comcast, and Verizon Communications, have opposed regulation or new laws that would dictate how they could run their networks. Up until this point the Internet has been free of any regulation. And these companies would like to keep it that way.
    That said, the nation's two biggest phone companies, AT&T and Verizon Communications, have accepted the principles outlined by the FCC when it comes to their wired broadband networks. Even though they don't think additional regulation is needed, they have agreed in principle with keeping their broadband networks open.
    But the regulation that Genachowski is proposing will not just apply to wireline broadband networks, such as DSL and cable modem service. It will also apply to wireless services.
    And this is where the major phone companies will likely focus their opposition to the FCC's plans for new regulation. Verizon and AT&T, which operate the nation's largest and second largest cell phone networks respectively, say the rules should not apply to wireless Internet access.
    "AT&T has long supported the principle of an open Internet and has conducted its business accordingly," Jim Cicconi, AT&T's senior vice president of external and legislative affairs, said in a statement. "We were also early supporters of the FCC's current four broadband principles and their case-by-case application to wired networks."
    But Cicconi went on to say that the principles and new legislation should not apply to the wireless market.
    "We are concerned, however, that the FCC appears ready to extend the entire array of net neutrality requirements to what is perhaps the most competitive consumer market in America, wireless services," he said.

    Source: CNet Full Article

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    Sounds good until I actually thought about how wrong it is to tell a company how to operate.....so much for competition dictating decision making eh ?
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    If this passes, Perhaps Verizon would be forced to unlock their darn GPS on some of their berries. As it falls into the Neuturality catagory Just my thoughts..
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    If this fully goes through, i can see a few things that may happen:
    1. Landline Broadband (DSL, CABLE, Fiberoptic) dropping in price to bring customers back off Wireless Networks (Verizon Wireless, Sprint, AT&T, etc)
    2. Wireless Networks drop the price from $59.99 to a more reasonable price to pull more users from Landline to Wireless
    3. The so-called "possible overload" of users on the wireless structure will prove to be false and the networks will be shown to support more users of constant bandwidth.
    4. Landline based networks will be the next alternative to internet/broadband solutions, ie. wireless broadband will be primary.

    Ive been waiting for this to come down the pipes for some time now, just my foresight on what may happen. But then again, only time will tell.
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by maz94protege View Post
    If this fully goes through, i can see a few things that may happen:
    1. Landline Broadband (DSL, CABLE, Fiberoptic) dropping in price to bring customers back off Wireless Networks (Verizon Wireless, Sprint, AT&T, etc)
    2. Wireless Networks drop the price from $59.99 to a more reasonable price to pull more users from Landline to Wireless
    3. The so-called "possible overload" of users on the wireless structure will prove to be false and the networks will be shown to support more users of constant bandwidth.
    4. Landline based networks will be the next alternative to internet/broadband solutions, ie. wireless broadband will be primary.

    Ive been waiting for this to come down the pipes for some time now, just my foresight on what may happen. But then again, only time will tell.
    I agree. And another note I would say that its not so much telling business how to run but more like leveling the playing field. Verizon and AT&T are complaining about it because it will make them actually work for their customers, instead of before where they would try to squeeze every last penny they could outta them and provide them with shoty support. A truley free market encourages competition, it doesn't stifle it.

    And Id like to add one more thing to maz94protege's list
    5. Faster speeds, maybe even reasonably priced symmetrical speeds in an effort to keep and/or attract customers


    I personally see only good things coming from this.
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