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In the end i wonder if its worth it all, using data on the mobile ... BlackBerry Bold forum

  1. #16
    RemyKirin's Avatar
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    In the end i wonder if its worth it all, using data on the mobile network that is; as technology progresses, the speed and data consumption increases. And as a result isp companies get upset cuz they only buy xx amount of bandwidth but they have been advertising xxxx for a year already, and when more and more of their customers try to use their given xxxx, the network bottlenecks and in order to save face they start imposing restrictions on the stuff they shouldn't have advertised in the first place. When you lay it all out on the table it gives you a headache.

    So in the end your choices for using the interweb on ur phone remember that its meant to be used as a backup internet connection, not a primary. And for the record you should be glad that tmo doesnt charge extra just to let you tether , like some other phone companies do. The OP lives in another large metropolis area, if you need mobile internet that bad for tethering, drop the data plan from your phone and sign up for clear internet service, then you can download and stream to your hearts content and probably for the same price too. Also they sell a mini wifi attachment for their device so you can use wifi on both ur phone and compy at the same time. trying to find a way to cheat the mobile company isnt a good way to go, even if you find a way you may get banned altogether like people that get caught uncapping the modems.

    Sorry for the long reply i get long in the tooth early in the morning... ugh i need coffee
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  2. #17
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    We all need coffee, you're not alone - Yes, I think the best option for the op would be his own internet connection lol.
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  3. #18
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    possible work arond

    if you are on BES and get all your data to go through the BES, then it is not picked up by the carrier network.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulnoise View Post
    if you are on BES and get all your data to go through the BES, then it is not picked up by the carrier network.
    Not understanding your comment. Even if you are on a BES your device uses the carrier to provide the wireless service
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  5. #20
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    U have unlimited data you said they should not be doing tat...tats bull crap n only idea I got is to use your data more when you get unlimted talk time like at 7:00 a clock cause usually when tat comes its all free till like at 12 at midnight I think

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by RemyKirin View Post
    and you, are you telling me you read your entire contract before you left the store? because i seriously find that hard to believe. Its 20 friggin pages. the BB TOS device Terms and conditions which is 14 pages, and that doesnt include the software terms and conditions for using app world and all the other mainstream apps on the smart phone you probably use like hmmm idk Google. btw i have links to all the above just in case u dont want to be a hypocrite. We all skip them because we dont wanna spend the entire day reading contracts. I dont suck up bandwidth but im still shocked to learn this
    Yes, as a matter of fact I did read every word of my contract, right there in the store. I learned way back in kindergarten that if you did not read all the instructions, you might fail the test. By the way, I don't speed read in the traditional sense, but I do read over 600 words a minute. I also read all TOS, and every contract I sign, it may tick off the salesperson, but what do I care? Part of their job is to make sure I read them, and if it takes me four hours to read em, oh friggin well.

    I also read my entire phone bil when its ready, I can't count the number of times AT&T tried to deduct minutes for failed calls that dropped in the middle of their service area. According to my contract, all those minutes are supposed to be refunded. I wouldn't know that if I hadn't read my contract. I also would have owed Sprint $569 if I hadn't read my contract and knew I could cancel my service without the ETF if I didn't live inside the Sprint network.

    So, in short, hypocracy is for the uneducated, and I will keep myself educated by reading, as I have done since kindergarten.
    Last edited by adperdue; 12-30-2010 at 09:10 AM. Reason: spelling

  7. #22
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    One may read contracts, but it ends up being a matter of definition and bad advertising practice. To me unlimited means unlimited not limited to 5Gb. I am sure there could be a lawsuit in there somewhere. Why advertise an unlimited plan and then limit it to 5Gb other than to deceive the customer, hoping that they will not read the contract fully?

  8. #23
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    Technically, T-Mobile doesn't stop your internet service when you hit the 5gb cap. What they do at that point is throttle it down. I noticed that in the account screen we can now see if a customer is being throttled on their internet speeds. I am waiting to see if that will happen to us since we started tethering this month. (Wife has racked up over 6gb's of data in less than 20days).

    Zo

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by pdxmatts View Post
    I use wifi 99% of the time. When I had my BB I had it set to wifi preferred. I Love Wifi. I wouldn't buy a phone that didn't have wifi. And, wifi is faster than 3G.
    i don't know about faster, but i would say more consistent *wink* sorry had to do it
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  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amigotek View Post
    Technically, T-Mobile doesn't stop your internet service when you hit the 5gb cap. What they do at that point is throttle it down. I noticed that in the account screen we can now see if a customer is being throttled on their internet speeds. I am waiting to see if that will happen to us since we started tethering this month. (Wife has racked up over 6gb's of data in less than 20days).

    Zo
    They will shut you down. I use close to or over 5gb of data without tethering. I just upload and download from my phone like crazy. But they will warn you. However if you keep doing it or you are using a crazy amount of data in a short time they will stop the service because you are using it a lot.
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  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonnyxedge View Post
    i don't know about faster, but i would say more consistent *wink* sorry had to do it
    Haha! Depends on your wifi router speed. Mine is pulling 11.80mb download and 8.60mb upload. 3G is like 1-2mbs

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by adperdue View Post
    Yes, as a matter of fact I did read every word of my contract, right there in the store. I learned way back in kindergarten that if you did not read all the instructions, you might fail the test. By the way, I don't speed read in the traditional sense, but I do read over 600 words a minute. I also read all TOS, and every contract I sign, it may tick off the salesperson, but what do I care? Part of their job is to make sure I read them, and if it takes me four hours to read em, oh friggin well.

    I also read my entire phone bil when its ready, I can't count the number of times AT&T tried to deduct minutes for failed calls that dropped in the middle of their service area. According to my contract, all those minutes are supposed to be refunded. I wouldn't know that if I hadn't read my contract. I also would have owed Sprint $569 if I hadn't read my contract and knew I could cancel my service without the ETF if I didn't live inside the Sprint network.

    So, in short, hypocracy is for the uneducated, and I will keep myself educated by reading, as I have done since kindergarten.
    TOSes are written by lawyers for lawyers, and exist for the sole purpose of avoiding litigation via 'I told you so'. While technically the TOS obeys the laws meant to protect the consumer, it's ridiculous to think that they, in any way or form, are made in the spirit of the law. Most of them are far too long and obfuscated to reasonably expect the layman to read through. And it's for that reason that I'm pretty sure class action lawsuits have been won despite EULAs and TOSes being in the defendant's favor (having been written by them), for the simple reason that expecting every single person who buys or subscribes to that product to read through such dense text is going a little too far.

    In any case, if the OP's case is anything like with regular ISPs then the cap might be 'soft', i.e not spelled out
    overtly in the contract but rather covered under the telco's fair-usage-policy, or FUP, which allows the telco some flexibility regarding who should be capped (i.e the how much data the subscriber uses versus the average network congestion in his area). If this is so then you might be able to get the cap waivered simply by calling up the company reps and being really nice.

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