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Laura, you are of course correct that a number companies have moved away from BB, ... Smartphone News forum

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    Laura, you are of course correct that a number companies have moved away from BB, and it while it depends on what the industries are that have made that move, one wonders what the reaction will be when there is a breach in the security or when a virus invades the company system. Halliburton is one of the companies that has moved away from BlackBerry it is also one that is rightly or wrongly not one of the most liked companies, so it is open to attacks from various sources, it will be interesting to see what happens. While I understand why they moved as they feel they can run some of there software on the phones and a big push was made to help the move go smoothly it will be interesting to see the outcome
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    Quote Originally Posted by srl7741 View Post
    I read that the same as dushdavj did but feel different about the 75 million users portion. Remove the data contracts holding many of those 75 million users and we would see a different picture.

    How about we just for a moment remove all contracts and ask what would users chose if given that freedom? (Company or personal user).
    Maybe the question should actually be how many people would buy a smartphone if they had to pay the actual price rather than the carrier subsidized price? $600-800 for a phone? Doesn't matter which OS still a lot of money. Would I buy something that puts me in contact with my job 24/7 costing that much money, or to allow friends and family to contact me or even so I could search the web to find a restaurant? The answer is no, a standard cell phone would do what I needed, plus a guide book for new cities, and a laptop with WiFi, it worked before
    Love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful, and optimistic. And we will change the world. - Jack Layton (1950-2011)
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    Quote Originally Posted by dushdavj View Post
    Laura, you are of course correct that a number companies have moved away from BB, and it while it depends on what the industries are that have made that move, one wonders what the reaction will be when there is a breach in the security or when a virus invades the company system. Halliburton is one of the companies that has moved away from BlackBerry it is also one that is rightly or wrongly not one of the most liked companies, so it is open to attacks from various sources, it will be interesting to see what happens. While I understand why they moved as they feel they can run some of there software on the phones and a big push was made to help the move go smoothly it will be interesting to see the outcome
    I wonder if Halliburton (and even the US government) knows something or has a hunch about who might possibly buy RIM. If they suspect that RIM will be sold to a company in a country that is not on friendly terms with the US, that could explain the moves away from RIM products. I know the GSA is now issuing iPhones and Androids to some government employees.

    If RIM were sold, and its NOC landed in the hands of a company based in a country that is not a US ally, the US government would need a different option, as would a lot of private sector companies, particularly those with government contracts.
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    Quote Originally Posted by dushdavj View Post
    Maybe the question should actually be how many people would buy a smartphone if they had to pay the actual price rather than the carrier subsidized price? $600-800 for a phone? Doesn't matter which OS still a lot of money. Would I buy something that puts me in contact with my job 24/7 costing that much money, or to allow friends and family to contact me or even so I could search the web to find a restaurant? The answer is no, a standard cell phone would do what I needed, plus a guide book for new cities, and a laptop with WiFi, it worked before
    Great point! If that were to happen, I would expect that price plans would change drastically, ie there would be no contracts and plans would be prepaid. Carriers would not be able to charge high monthly fees if there were no subsidies.

    Many folks would probably keep their devices a lot longer, more like the length of time they keep their computers, instead of upgrading every 1-2 years.
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    Quote Originally Posted by lak611 View Post
    I wonder if Halliburton (and even the US government) knows something or has a hunch about who might possibly buy RIM. If they suspect that RIM will be sold to a company in a country that is not on friendly terms with the US, that could explain the moves away from RIM products. I know the GSA is now issuing iPhones and Androids to some government employees.

    If RIM were sold, and its NOC landed in the hands of a company based in a country that is not a US ally, the US government would need a different option, as would a lot of private sector companies, particularly those with government contracts.
    Hmm very good point, something I hadn't really considered and of course RIM being sold is speculation, but one should also remember that the Canadian government may well stop the company being sold to an unfriendly power, particularly as they also use RIM phones. I would think the US government trying different phones is what they always are supposed to do check the competition and ensure that they are getting the optimum price/deal on bulk purchases, wait this is the government we are talking about, they don't look to get the best price, maybe you are right Laura
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    Oh God, I see another bailout now

    This came up in the beginning of RIM's problems. They would not be allowed to sell anything if that was a concern. You don't find much on that topic but it's definitely a concern and real. Good point lak611

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    Quote Originally Posted by dushdavj View Post
    Hmm very good point, something I hadn't really considered and of course RIM being sold is speculation, but one should also remember that the Canadian government may well stop the company being sold to an unfriendly power, particularly as they also use RIM phones. I would think the US government trying different phones is what they always are supposed to do check the competition and ensure that they are getting the optimum price/deal on bulk purchases, wait this is the government we are talking about, they don't look to get the best price, maybe you are right Laura
    Dave, it seems that the Canadian government has not issued any definitive statement about sale of RIM to a company in another country at this time. http://www.foxbusiness.com/technology/2012/04/04/will-canada-allow-rim-to-fall-into-foreign-hands/



    I am really not sure how Canada feels toward sales to companies in countries not friendly toward the US. My guess is that it is important, since Canada does not have a really strong military presence, and the fact that Canada borders the US probably provides more security for Canada than anything else.

    If the US government really were looking to save money, that would be a first! I still remember the $900 toilet seat and the $600 allen wrench.
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    Quote Originally Posted by srl7741 View Post
    Oh God, I see another bailout now

    This came up in the beginning of RIM's problems. They would not be allowed to sell anything if that was a concern. You don't find much on that topic but it's definitely a concern and real. Good point lak611
    Nortel failed, despite a bailout.
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    Sale of companies need to be approved, normally to ensure competition continue TMobile/ATT case in point. I am sure that no statement has been paid but it would most definitely be a consideration if this were to ever occur. Makes you wonder about other sides of the coin, Apple and the majority of companies build all their tech hardware outside of the US, could something be placed in the hardware to allow for tracking, after all they have GPS inside. How useful would it be to an unfriendly foreign power to know where individuals performing covert action are? It opens up a hornets nest of considerations
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    Quote Originally Posted by dushdavj View Post
    Sale of companies need to be approved, normally to ensure competition continue TMobile/ATT case in point. I am sure that no statement has been paid but it would most definitely be a consideration if this were to ever occur. Makes you wonder about other sides of the coin, Apple and the majority of companies build all their tech hardware outside of the US, could something be placed in the hardware to allow for tracking, after all they have GPS inside. How useful would it be to an unfriendly foreign power to know where individuals performing covert action are? It opens up a hornets nest of considerations
    That's a good question.

    Right now it looks like VZW will choke T-Mobile out of business by buying up the LTE spectrum. If AT&T was not allowed to buy T-Mobile outright, then I do not feel that VZW should be allowed to put T-Mobile out of business by buying up spectrum.

    Re: hardware manufacturing, I am not aware of any hardware manufactured in the US. Even RIM outsources most of the hardware manufacturing, rather than manufacture in Canada.
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