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    Article: Another federal agency ditching BlackBerry

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    Rollin', rollin'... I'm talking snowball.
    It won't stop unfortunately. Once the door gets cracked open by others, the tide is unstoppable.
    In this business, or any other.
    Except for bankers...they get more to roll over.

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    Siri' most popular ATF queries
    "directions to nearest crackhouse"
    "Where did they hide the body"
    "How many clips do I need for a raid"
    "Define 'civil rights' "

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    I see it even made the news on TV. Uh oh.......... It's one thing to make the tech blogs but another to get air time on everyones TV.

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    If RIM loses it's hold on business, which you can see they are, they will become a mediocre source for smartphones. They are too far behind and too slow to react to catch up on technology. Miracles are pretty hard to come by.

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    I keep forgetting America is the center of the Universe so this will obviously be a big problem for RIM 3000 here, 3000 there, Halliburton and others all going for ease of use. We’ll see what they think after a year or so, security wise, efficiency wise (employees spending more time playing on their phones , ‘cos they can ) etc. It is still sad to see though.

    Just for the record RIM is expanding in India, Indonesia, South East Asia, and UK. They have over 74 million handsets in circulation, the UK police have been issued BB’s with fingerprint readers on them, in order to check peoples identity, but then that’s in the rest of the world somewhere the US is not focused on unless there is oil there

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    I do not think RIM's current success in the Asian markets will be enough to save the company, especially with all the inexpensive Androids that are beginning to flood Asian markets.

    Also, as far as trends starting in the US and continuing elsewhere, it seems to be true in many cases. I worked with a man who grew up in the former Soviet Union. He mentioned how US products were very popular, even though they were on the black market in the USSR. Everyone wanted Levi's, not the jeans made in the USSR.
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    Quote Originally Posted by lak611 View Post
    I do not think RIM's current success in the Asian markets will be enough to save the company, especially with all the inexpensive Androids that are beginning to flood Asian markets.

    Also, as far as trends starting in the US and continuing elsewhere, it seems to be true in many cases. I worked with a man who grew up in the former Soviet Union. He mentioned how US products were very popular, even though they were on the black market in the USSR. Everyone wanted Levi's, not the jeans made in the USSR.
    Levis are very popular in Indonesia as well (although they are made in Indonesia exported and then re-imported at an exorbitant price.
    It still remains the BB is popular, you may be correct regarding the future, it will depend on what RIM do in the next year or so.


    I do wonder about the move away from BB in these government agencies especially when reports come out about a social networking site quietly downloading a person’s address book from their IPhone without their permission, and now there is a further report that developers can get access to the IOS photo library and location history, something I would think would be very useful to those with criminal intent trying to avoid the federal agency that is coming after them . What other loopholes are in the operating systems that can be exploited?
    Love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful, and optimistic. And we will change the world. - Jack Layton (1950-2011)
    Blackberry PlayBook 64GB Nokia 1020, Microsoft Surface PRO 2

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    Quote Originally Posted by dushdavj View Post
    Levis are very popular in Indonesia as well (although they are made in Indonesia exported and then re-imported at an exorbitant price.
    That's true. Back in the 70s, when my co-worker was a teenager/young adult in Russia, the Levi's were made in the US.
    It still remains the BB is popular, you may be correct regarding the future, it will depend on what RIM do in the next year or so.


    I do wonder about the move away from BB in these government agencies especially when reports come out about a social networking site quietly downloading a person’s address book from their IPhone without their permission, and now there is a further report that developers can get access to the IOS photo library and location history, something I would think would be very useful to those with criminal intent trying to avoid the federal agency that is coming after them . What other loopholes are in the operating systems that can be exploited?
    I suspect that the iOS devices used in secure environments will be locked down, and will only allow agency apps, not anything available to consumers.
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    I've been a long time BB enthusiast, and having have owned almost every major BB release, even I hit the point of looking around last year with an intent of not coming back to the BB again. This had been happening on and off for a few years since the 1st iPhone, then back to the BB, then the 3rd iPhone, and 1st/2nd android phone on Tmobile. I realized that there some basic "features" that are a must on a smartphone -- those being a good email client that supports all your IMAP folders, a good browser, and some integration of the most popular services/apps (Facebook, twitter, etc...). A good camera for the one time you need it is also nice. Anyway, I realized at one point that no matter how great the BB was, and now matter how good the battery life was, and how well the things that did work worked, the time had just come for more power/something better. It had gotten to the point where CPU, Memory, and Screen size had not changed by much over 5+ years. At the end of the day, my view is that RIM didn't innovate fast enough. Everything they released was extremely solid (the Bold 9700 was the best smartphone (truly a "SMART" "PHONE") ever made, and i do have the BB playbook, and I love it), but they simply couldn't afford to release a smartphone in 2008-2009 that had problems with "not enough memory", when you could get 8GB sd cards for a few dollars. Also, they couldn't release a phone with a camera that took fuzzy pictures because it was 2MPs when the IPhone had just come out with a 5MP camera that took crystal clear pictures, and fast too. I think overall this is what put them behind to a point where consumers started looking around and moving on. Yes, there are a few places that do not even allow cameras on their smartphones, or music, or pictures, and those places will most likely continue having a blackberry, but at the end of the day, even businessman are people who want shinny and some form of ease/useful/innovation. RIM is not "dead" as most people claim. They just need to find their niche and target it like crazy, sort of the way they did before. They need to realize that people do want innovation, and there's a point where you are willing to give up a bit security/build quality/etc... for innovation. I remember when over the course of 6-8 months EVERYONE at my job switched their BB for an iPhone. At first people were not happy. The iPhone did not even come close to the BB. But it had a superb browser (the 1st iPhone), and a mind blowing email client (same rendering as the browser). Those things alone made people stick with it. Slowly it grew on them, and slowly Apple got their act together and started targeting the business side with exchange, onboard encryption, etc...The same happened with Android. Having used the first android phone (the G1), and then the first myTouch, and having to bear with not having apps, and not having constant email clients/featuers (imap, push, calendar popups)/alerts, and not having exchange, etc.. I still think that what kept me on Android eventually was their innovation. Yes, this and that was terrible, but in return, I got a few very new/modern things (browser, camera, storage, speed, big screen etc...) I think this is what RIM needs to do - they need to innovate AND deliver on a TIMELY manner. I think they have partially realized it with the BB playbook. While producing one-shot products is fantastic, having 2-3 releases is not the end of the world. People will be much happier if RIM released something new every 8-10 months, and every other wasn't the best in the world.
    Last edited by ventz; 02-29-2012 at 06:20 PM.
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    Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (BlackBerry; U; BlackBerry 9700; en) AppleWebKit/534.8+ (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/6.0.0.723 Mobile Safari/534.8+)

    ventz, I would like to see RIM come back and succeed. However, I don't know what it's niche really is anymore. There are probably not enough agencies and companies with the need for the strictest security to keep RIM afloat, given the high cost of its infrastructure.
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    I think that there are a lot of businesses that require extremely strict policies/security/encryption, when it comes to mobile devices. I have a few friends who work in environments that have what I consider ABSURD mobile device requirements/policies (and these are not your typical agencies that everyone assumes). I would guess that about 20% of the mobile customers are businesses that require security. But RIM can't be everything. They need to separate their business/military side from their consumer side.

    From a consumer stand point for example, not having full IMAP support for external accounts is ridiculous at this day and age. Yes having my inbox pushed within 2 seconds of an email being sent is great, but what about the other 20 folders? Not having HTML rendering (does everyone remember empowered pro? ) is also insane at this day and age. Memory limitations? A 480x360 screen size -- when everyone else is pushing 1280x720? A 3MP camera when most phones are trying push past the 8-10MP camera? Don't get me wrong, other companies have my other problems -- for example, a phone, at the end of the day, needs to keep a battery life and you need to be able to hear/be-heard by others. The speaker phone needs to be easily reachable (and I don't meant by 5 clicks -- this makes it impossible while driving).

    The main point/question is, does a smartphone platform have the majority of what consumers are looking for and seeking, and with RIM, the answer is "no".
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    Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (BlackBerry; U; BlackBerry 9700; en) AppleWebKit/534.8+ (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/6.0.0.723 Mobile Safari/534.8+)

    Do you think RIM could survive strictly on the 20% of businesses that need that kind of security if it exits the consumer market? I do not see where there would be enough money to support the NOC.

    Also, other companies are getting into the mobile security business.
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    Even private companies once relying on Blackberries have declined their products. The company I work for, number one on its sector has ditched RIM's products and now acquired Android/Apple devices instead for the workforce. Eversince RIM's last stunt where no emails came in and such, cost the company millions because our clients could not communicate with us.

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    Raton, what's interesting about that is that the last 3 places I have worked have had larger exchange outages than that, and I remember in '07-'09, Google had a few 1-2 day outages within Gmail -- but it's the BB one that everyone remembers

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