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    RogerG's Avatar
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    Shut Down, Sleep or Hibernate?

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    My Dell XPS M1530 is an awesome machine. My warranty just expired, but I was able to send it in for a check-up, reloaded Windows 7 64 bit and Office Pro 2010 (32 bit). Everything seems to be running smooth and well.

    I've Googled this and see lots of varying opinions so wanted to get more here.

    In the three years I've owned the laptop, I rarely completely shut it down. I have it set to sleep when I close the lid.

    What are your thoughts on this vs. a complete shut down, or even hibernate mode, which I've never used?

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    chokem's Avatar
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    I have a Dell Studio 15, W7 64 bit, with 4GB RAM 500 GB HD. I can't tell the difference between sleep and hibernate. If I let it sit there more than an hour with the lid closed, in sleep or hibernate mode, I have to end up rebooting it anyway. So I just shut it completely down if I'm not going to use it for any length of time.
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    Mine sleeps just fine. I mean, it sleeps when I close the lid and wakes up when I open the lid. Sometimes I think it hibernates, but Windows resumes when I hit the power button.

    I'm just wondering what would cause more wear and tear. A complete shutdown, or just letting it sleep.

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    I guess I've never really seen much difference in the three? Guess it depends on what your use habits are. I think in the last 3 years I've shut down my MBP one or two times. When I close the lid it goes to sleep and the HD powers down. Seems quicker when lifting the lid rather than waiting 30-45 seconds for it to boot up. Plus running programs are still there ready to go.

    My answer would be it depends on your likes/dislikes. Leaving it on 24/7 is what I've always done

  5. #5
    RogerG's Avatar
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    Yeah, same here, Steve. I've done that with my last three laptops.

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    From Microsoft:
    Sleep is a power-saving state that allows a computer to quickly resume full-power operation (typically within several seconds) when you want to start working again. Putting your computer into the sleep state is like pausing a DVD player—the computer immediately stops what it’s doing and is ready to start again when you want to resume working.Hibernation is a power-saving state designed primarily for laptops. While sleep puts your work and settings in memory and draws a small amount of power, hibernation puts your open documents and programs on your hard disk, and then turns off your computer. Of all the power-saving states in Windows, hibernation uses the least amount of power. On a laptop, use hibernation when you know that you won't use your laptop for an extended period and won't have an opportunity to charge the battery during that time.


    I use sleep, not hibernate, and I rarely turn off my laptop.


    Laura

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    There is quite a difference between the three. Sleep and hibernate allow you to come back on really quickly and their main use is to save on battery life while going between offices, you can either put your computer into sleep mode which means that you are not completely shutting down, you are saving your current location, screen, programs that you are running to device memory, (the more memory you have available the more likely it will work with no problem, less memory nowhere to save information), then the computer basically goes into minimal battery usage normally you will see the red light continue to flash. Once you are ready to work again just start it up and it instantly comes on.


    Hibernate on the other hand saves everything to the disk (a location is normally set up for you prior to your first use), when you put it into hibernate mode you see a screen saying saving to disk, basically dumps everything currently in the menu to disk. Then the computer switches off. No worries about battery running down. When you are ready to go again you press start and everything is restored to where you were before. Probably a slightly safer thing to do if you are thinking of having it shut down for a while and you are not intending to have the laptop plugged in. The beauty of both of the above methods is not having to wait for the normally long (in relative) time device boot up.


    Finally Shut Down. This is a total shutdown of your system, everything in your device memory is cleared, when you switch it back on it will do a complete boot and start fresh (rather like have a good sleep and waking up refreshed in the morning) instead of working late sleeping 2 hours and restarting groggy (my normal mode ). I tend to shut down my computer at night (old habits die hard) since I like to make sure that there is no errors, or programs hanging around in the memory that will slow the computer, (used to be a major problem in the early days of Windows) now the computer bloatware is so big and we have so much memory it is unlikely that we would notice this sort of problem even if it were there. However I would recommend that you restart your computers at least 2 to 3 times a week just to keep everything in the memory pristine whilst it gives the OS a chance to go through and check the memory etc.

    On another note it is also worthwhile performing a chkdisk type scan regularly which gives the computer a chance to check for disk errors, mark bad locations and avoid using them. There are several good programs out there which will do this whilst the computer is running, and of course Windows comes with Chkdsk which will shut the computer down run chkdsk and then restart. With such big hard disks a lot of people forget or do not bother to do this, it used to be very necessary, but this along with backing up your data is probably two tasks which should be done but tend to be forgotten.
    Love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful, and optimistic. And we will change the world. - Jack Layton (1950-2011)
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  8. #8
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    I have hardly ever fully shut my laptops down unless I am going to be gone for more than 2 days. I used to go to the Start menu to Hibernate put I find that just shutting the lid does the same thing, even faster at times. When I was using a desktop, I would have no choice but to fully shut down because I was nowhere near the desk I was using at the time.


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    Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; MSIE 9.0; Windows NT 6.1; Trident/5.0; XBLWP7; ZuneWP7))

    I use hybrid sleep on a desktop, and lock the screen when I'm away.
    Laura

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