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Well, I lost my second hard drive in a month's time on my Dell XPS ... Linux OS forum

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    RogerG's Avatar
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    Question/Opportunity.....

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    Well, I lost my second hard drive in a month's time on my Dell XPS laptop. This time they weren't able to recover ANYTHING from the drive, so I'm basically starting from scratch with the stock Vista OS that came on the laptop.

    I've been curious about running Linux vs. Windows, but know absolutely nothing about it.

    I rely a lot on the Outlook client for e-mail and in fact sync my iPhone with Outlook e-mail addresses.

    Anyway, I'm clueless here, so any and all advice would be appreciated.

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    Wish I could help you, but I'm clueless about Linux as well. My work relies heavily on Macs, so that's what I'm used to. I can't even find my way around a Windows based machine now. Hopefully someone will enlighten you about Linux.

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    As far as a linux distro i personally learned on openSUSE with the kde desktop and if im not mistaken you can sync your iphone with thunderbird but it might take some work at it, the kde desktop is alot like windows not much of a learning curve but you can run multiple desktops to see which one you like best so there really isn't to much of a learning curve when coming to linux for the most part

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    Geez, Chris.....you totally lost me there! LOL!

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    :P

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    lets just say i would give it a try and see what you think lol

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    oh yeah i forgot to mention you can download a live cd that you can try out openSUSE here

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    Hi Roger, I am afraid that the answer to your question is not that simple. There are many different varieties of Linux out there, each with different GUI on top of them, much the same as you see so many Android phones out there, and of course the Apple operating system is also built on Linux. Sometimes you will have to go into a terminal window to do things but the commands are quite quick to learn similar to DOS (do you remember that?). I think to run Outlook you would have to run it in a virtual window (basically running Windows) which is possible see the following link:

    http://www.fsckin.com/2007/10/29/how...ng-virtualbox/

    Running Linux does have some advantages especially cost since you can get it virtually free as a personal user (companies should in theory purchase a license of Red Hat for example), you can also download OpenOffice which is very similar to Microsoft office (it can open the majority of office files). Learning curve is not too steep, the footprint is a lot smaller, you can address each processor individually which is nice especially if you are doing a lot of heavy computing. Drivers may be an issue sometimes depending on your graphics cards, although I believe the XPS is probably ok. I would tend to go for 64 bit rather than 32 bit (for both Linux or Windows).

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    Quote Originally Posted by dushdavj View Post
    Hi Roger, I am afraid that the answer to your question is not that simple. There are many different varieties of Linux out there, each with different GUI on top of them, much the same as you see so many Android phones out there, and of course the Apple operating system is also built on Linux. Sometimes you will have to go into a terminal window to do things but the commands are quite quick to learn similar to DOS (do you remember that?). I think to run Outlook you would have to run it in a virtual window (basically running Windows) which is possible see the following link:

    http://www.fsckin.com/2007/10/29/how...ng-virtualbox/

    Running Linux does have some advantages especially cost since you can get it virtually free as a personal user (companies should in theory purchase a license of Red Hat for example), you can also download OpenOffice which is very similar to Microsoft office (it can open the majority of office files). Learning curve is not too steep, the footprint is a lot smaller, you can address each processor individually which is nice especially if you are doing a lot of heavy computing. Drivers may be an issue sometimes depending on your graphics cards, although I believe the XPS is probably ok. I would tend to go for 64 bit rather than 32 bit (for both Linux or Windows).
    going into the command doesn't happen very often in linux anymore these days, they have made things alot simpler, but im not saying you won't have to either

    but like i said you can try it out from a live cd to see if it works and all your drivers are loaded and everything works before you ever load it onto your computer or laptop

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    You may want to look at Ubuntu, or Fedora, which are the ones a lot of students use (each of which can be downloaded of the web, openSUSE is another version as Chris suggested, all are based on RedHat just slightly different GUI's. I am currently using Redhat as the software I needed would not work with the others, more a fault of the software maker (non standard), but Ubuntu seemed to be quite easy to learn.

    You can buy (Linux for Dummies) which actually comes with a CD with several different versions on it including Xandros, Ubuntu, openSUSE, Fedora and Debian) see I told you it gets confusing, but it is not as bad as it seems, as once you chose one you stick to it . The software is continually being updated which is nice. I have heard that Xandros is for first time users so may be easier to learn www.xandros.com

    There is also a program called CrossOver Office which allows you to install Office XP on Linux, I haven't tried it though. www.codeweavers.com

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    The only bad thing about fedora which is a good distro is that it is a cutting edge so to speak distro and can have alot of problems, but ubuntu, is primarily a gnome desktop which will take some getting used to, openSUSE is a kde desktop which is polished distro but alot is personal preference

    but like i said if you have cdr's laying around i would just try some distros out and see which you like and fits your needs and when you find it stick with it.

    as far as crossover office i've tryed it years ago not to impressed with it, but it might have changed since then

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    I think Havoc65 is giving some good advice, the less command line you have to do the better. It is great that you can try some different approaches, especially you have an open plate so to speak with nothing on your computer at the moment. I have used Ubuntu (only 32 bit) and Fedora (64 bit) and did prefer Fedora, openSUSE sounds interesting, after all you want to try and keep it as close to what you are used to as possible.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dushdavj View Post
    I think Havoc65 is giving some good advice, the less command line you have to do the better. It is great that you can try some different approaches, especially you have an open plate so to speak with nothing on your computer at the moment. I have used Ubuntu (only 32 bit) and Fedora (64 bit) and did prefer Fedora, openSUSE sounds interesting, after all you want to try and keep it as close to what you are used to as possible.
    totally agrees with dushdavj

    i've tried fedora when it was fedora6 or something like that i've also tried red hat when it was free lol but once i've found openSUSE that got me hooked so thats where i stayed

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    Roger, dude you didn't even mention being interested in getting a Mac?? Hands down better than any PC I've ever owned..... my 2 cents
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  15. #15
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    Well, if y'all wanna pool your funds and buy me a Mac, I'd be all over that.

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